Sea Caves Trip – 1/2 Day vs. Full Day

Our most popular trip in the Apostle Islands is to the sea caves near Cornucopia, via Meyers beach. This area is known as the “mainland sea caves” (There are other caves located out in the islands also.)

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Our guests often ask us which trip would fit them better; our half-day or full day exploration. Since either trip would be good for just about anyone, here are a few facts to consider when making your decision.

Time: Our half-day trip is about a 4 hour total commitment, with 2.5 hours on the water and the rest of the time learning about your kayak, practicing strokes, learning important safety information, and getting ready. Of course there is a short drive from our shop too. (4 miles. We’re really close!) If you have an appointment to meet, a ferry to catch, or a show to watch, the 1/2 day trip works well and provides a stress-free day if you are trying to do a lot of things while in the area.

Our full day trip is about a 7 hour total commitment (9am-4pm or 10am-5pm) This trip works well if you have the time and want to spend a nice day on the water, back in time for fish fry!

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Age/Fitness: Another question that comes up is since “we don’t have a lot of paddling experience” or “we have only been kayaking once” which trip would be best? Really, either one would be fine. During the full day trip we paddle about 8 miles, but have 6 hours to do it in. On the half-day trip we paddle just over 4 miles, and have 2.5 hours to do it in. You end up sitting in your boat 2.5 hours at a time either trip you choose. During our full day trip you get out for lunch for about an hour, so plenty of time to rest up for the paddle back.

For older folks our main concern is if your back is in good shape. Sitting in a kayak all day can be hard on anyones back, let alone if you have a previous injury.

Another consideration is if you are bringing kids, and whether or not they will be able to paddle the distance comfortably.

Cornucopia Sea Caves

Views: Does the half-day trip give you enough caves? What else do we see on the full day trip? These are common questions, but not all that you should consider. The cliff line that harbors the caves is about 2.5 miles long. During our half-day trip we paddle about half way down and turn around. On the full day trip we paddle past the entire cliff face to a beach, eat lunch, then turn around and head back. On the full day trip you get to see the whole cliff, which has some more caves (smaller) than at the beginning, and more waterfalls (when they are running) You also get to hang out on a nice beach and eat lunch. The unique thing that we do at Lost Creek is offer an EVENING half-day sea caves trip, which means we are the only outfitter that brings you out to the caves when the sun is hitting all of them, often with a bright orange color from the setting sun. This is my favorite time of day to be there, except for early morning when there is sometimes fog and mist in the caves. Another magical time.

Price: Obviously our half-day trip is going to cost less than the full day trip. One thing to keep in mind is the policy that all local outfitters have: Though you may have signed up for the mainland sea caves, if it is too windy at that location the outfitter will bring you to an alternate location. We do this as well when we can’t get to the main caves. Often we will instead bring you to Romans Point, or sometimes Houghtons Point, both of which have some smaller caves. At any rate, doing a 1/2 day trip provides you with lesser risk of going to a location that you may not have planned on, this being due to quickly changing weather patterns in our area. Due to our proximity to the caves we are able to keep our vehicle expenses down, which we pass on to you as the lowest cost sea cave trip in the area, while still offering the highest level of quality and safety.

Hopefully this has helped answer your questions about which trip is best for you. If not, leave us a note!

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